‘Faith,’ says Mr. Bell, in his View of the Covenants , p. 226, ‘rests upon Christ alone It in effect excludes itself as a work in the matter of justification. Paul's introduction of the quotation from Genesis 17:5, included in parenthesis in this verse, and especially God's use of the past tense, "have I made thee," proves that the previous covenant was distinct from the land covenant about to be made in the immediate future, and also indicated that the previous covenant (the great promise) was fulfilled by ,Christ the Saviour of the world. But faith is in no point of view equivalent to the obedience the law requires. As it was a seal of the righteousness which he had received by the faith which he had in a state of uncircumcision, it implied that righteousness would be imputed to believers in the same state. Raised again for our justification. He arose to assure to them their right to eternal life, by fully discovering and establishing it in His own person, for all who are the members of His body. Of all the preconditions of entering a covenant relationship with God, these being faith, repentance, confession, baptism (obedience to these conditions bringing the believer into Christ), baptism is less of a work than any of the others. He wrote: Therefore, if obeying the gospel and being baptized should be classed as "works" in any derogatory sense, then the same thing applies to faith, Christ himself making it a "work." Yet the expression, our Savior, is often used by persons who reject God’s testimony concerning Him, and consequently have neither part nor lot in His salvation. The New Testament For if Abraham was justified by works, he hath whereof to glory; but not toward God. As it is said, ‘They are not all Israel which are of Israel; neither, because they are the seed of Abraham, are they all children; but in Isaac shall thy seed be called; that is, they which are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God: but the children of the promise are counted for the seed,’ Romans 9:6. The sacred ordinance is belittled and set at naught on the grounds that it is a work of human righteousness, in no way related to salvation. Who is the father of us all. It is particularly to be noticed that not a word is said respecting Abraham’s sanctification, although his whole history, after leaving his own country, furnishes so remarkable an example of a holy walk and conversation. What a sorrow must have swept over Abraham's heart as he turned his back for the last time upon the battlements of Ur! But this is what might be expected from one who cannot see the human race guilty in Adam. Nothing like that is here. In Dr. Macknight’s note, however, on verse 3rd, already quoted, where he is laboring to prove that faith is countedFOR righteousness, or, according to Mr. Stuart and Mr. Tholuck,AS righteousness, he affirms, as has been observed, that God values faith as equal to complete performance of duty, and that it is nowhere said in Scripture that Christ’s righteousness is imputed to believers. — The righteousness of faith is an elliptical expression, meaning the righteousness which is received by faith. That obeying the gospel makes man his own Saviour. So what? That, as a pledge of all this, he and his seed should inherit the land of Canaan. And the father of circumcision to them who not only are of the circumcision, but who also walk in the steps of that faith of our father Abraham which he had in uncircumcision. He is to become heir of all things, "joint-heirs with Christ" (Romans 8:17). 3:30, that justification is not confined to the Jews, he asks if the blessedness he had spoken of comes only to those who are circumcised, or to the uncircumcised also. He is saved from the guilt of sin immediately on his believing. but, 1. Also, that is, He was as able to perform as to promise. Despite Paul's intention in this verse, it has been made the vehicle for some of the wildest theories ever advocated in the history of Christianity, among them being the proposition that Abraham was justified by faith alone without any works whatever. GenesisExodusLeviticusNumbersDeuteronomyJoshuaJudgesRuth1 Samuel2 Samuel1 Kings2 Kings1 Chronicles2 ChroniclesEzraNehemiahEstherJobPsalmsProverbsEcclesiastesSong of SongsIsaiahJeremiahLamentationsEzekielDanielHoseaJoelAmosObadiahJonahMicahNahumHabakkukZephaniahHaggaiZechariahMalachiMatthewMarkLukeJohnActsRomans1 Corinthians2 CorinthiansGalatiansEphesiansPhilippiansColossians1 Thessalonians2 Thessalonians1 Timothy2 TimothyTitusPhilemonHebrewsJames1 Peter2 Peter1 John2 John3 JohnJudeRevelation. It is the same with all who would walk in the steps of that faith now. Without disregarding it for a moment, he yielded to the Divine authority. It was only to such of them as had his faith that he was a father in what is spiritually represented by circumcision. But this is contrary to the meaning: it applies to work of any kind, and excludes all working of every kind or degree. -------------------- Not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham. But he is not ungodly after he believes, which is a character belonging only to the enemies of God. This is not said. But it is not on account of works that God justifies us.’ ‘We offer nothing to God,’ says Calvin; ‘but we are prevented by His grace altogether free, without His having any respect to our works.’. The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, He staggered not. This is entirely consistent with all the Apostle had said before respecting the manner in which the blessedness of Abraham had come upon him, solely by the imputation of righteousness received by faith, irrespective of any works of his. The revelation to Abraham was concerning a Christ to come; the revelation to us is concerning a Christ already come, which difference in the revelation does not alter the case. -------------------- How was it? When it is said, ‘If they which are of law,’ that is, who by obeying the law of God be heirs, the case is supposed, as in ch. The accounts we have of the Old-Testament saints were not intended for histories only, barely to inform and divert us, but for precedents to direct us, for ensamples (1 Co. 10:11) for our learning, ch. Faith and grace are not identical; and if one is saved by either of them "alone," the other is excluded. It has already been noted, but attention is again directed to the fact that Paul's lack of emphasis on obedience in this chapter stemmed from the imperfect nature of Abraham's obedience. It has already been noted that the Jews attributed near-miraculous powers to that rite, their learned teachers declaring unequivocally that no circumcised person would ever be in hell. — He staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief; but was strong in faith, giving glory to God. James and John left their nets and Zebedee their father; Paul left the honor of the Sanhedrin; they "left all and followed" Christ (Mark 10:28). Abraham obeyed! But Paul here showed that Abraham was justified a full thirteen years before that rite was given. It must imply a belief of the Gospel, not only as to the fact of a resurrection, but also as to the person and work of Christ. GenesisExodusLeviticusNumbersDeuteronomyJoshuaJudgesRuth1 Samuel2 Samuel1 Kings2 Kings1 Chronicles2 ChroniclesEzraNehemiahEstherJobPsalmsProverbsEcclesiastesSong of SongsIsaiahJeremiahLamentationsEzekielDanielHoseaJoelAmosObadiahJonahMicahNahumHabakkukZephaniahHaggaiZechariahMalachiMatthewMarkLukeJohnActsRomans1 Corinthians2 CorinthiansGalatiansEphesiansPhilippiansColossians1 Thessalonians2 Thessalonians1 Timothy2 TimothyTitusPhilemonHebrewsJames1 Peter2 Peter1 John2 John3 JohnJudeRevelation, Use semicolons to separate groups: 'Gen;Jdg;Psa-Mal' or 'Rom 3-12;Mat 1:15;Mat 5:12-22', There are options set in 'Advanced Options', The Whole Bible ‘Even the righteousness of God, which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe.’ Here righteousness is supposed to be one thing, and faith to be another.