The student subsample (n = 480) constituted the majority of the sample (71.4%). In multivariate analysis, younger nurses had statistically significant higher burnout (p = 0.04) and compassion fatigue scores (p = 0.01) and lower compassion satisfaction scores (p = 0.001) compared to nurses aged 40 years or older. The study was a cross-sectional descriptive design that used convenience sampling. When social workers perceive a positive change in the quality of life of the individual, family, or community they are serving, workers have a sense of fulfillment that motivates them to continue in the profession and perform well (Jones, 2005). A post-hoc test was run to determine specific differences among the three groups of students. From 2007 to 2011, all bachelor’s of social work (BSW) and MSW students serving as field interns (n = 480) at two universities (one private, one public) in the Southwestern United States were invited to participate in the study. We used a one-way ANOVA to assess differences in compassion satisfaction among social work students by status in their degree program. Although the students’ inexperience experience might contribute to the compassion fatigue that they experience, the higher level of compassion fatigue experienced by the professionals might be the result of cumulative, ongoing exposure to secondary trauma. Overall, as compared with national data (Stamm, 2005), the results showed that all student groups reported average levels of compassion satisfaction. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amj.2018.07.014. 2. Although some social work educators have begun to address the consequences of vicarious exposure to negative life events for students’ well-being, the consensus in professional literature calls for greater effort in preparing future social workers for the rigor of working with traumatized clients. Although the sample was large, the sample was not randomly selected, and therefore, the results cannot be generalized to the overall population of social work students. Some workers might report having intrusive, negative thoughts or use defense mechanisms such as avoiding certain clients and cases that are associated with negative or traumatic situations (Bride, 2007). In addition, further insight might be gained by including a follow-up data collection after the students have completed their degree programs and begun their professional careers. Social work educators and field agencies have an ethical responsibility to provide adequate knowledge and support for students during this critical time of preparation (Collins, Coffey, & Morris, 2010; Cunningham, 2004; Dziegielewski, Turnage, & Roest-Marti, 2004; Munson, 1984; Pottage & Huxley, 1996; Rompf, Royse, & Dhooper, 1993; Tobin & Carson, 1994). Our compassionate core requires us to either avoid negativity or to transform it. The current findings have implications for social work educators, especially field seminar instructors and agency field supervisors. Although recognizing that the potential for compassion fatigue will always exist, social work educators should work collaboratively with social work practitioners, agencies, and supervisors toward developing supports and tools to help recognize, decrease, and prevent the symptoms of compassion fatigue and burnout (Leon, Altholz, & Dziegielewski, 1999). Although burnout and compassion fatigue can share similar symptoms, they appear to be separate contributors to psychological distress. The average ProQOL R-IV burnout score of respondents was 22 (SD = 6.0), whereas the study respondents had an average burnout score of 20.31 (SD = 5.799), indicating the study’s respondents scored in the bottom quartile of national respondents. Therefore, social work educational curriculum and field agency training should prepare younger, inexperienced students to deal with the occupational hazard of compassion fatigue both during field placement and after graduation as they initiate professional practice. It is worth noting that students with lower levels of compassion fatigue experienced higher levels of compassion satisfaction whereas students with higher levels of compassion fatigue had lower levels of compassion satisfaction. This approach will assist students in developing a positive perspective that builds hope and a sense of efficacy and competence (Bell, 2003). Compassion satisfaction describes nurses' satisfaction when caring for patients and feeling competent and supported by colleagues. This finding suggests that life experience and maturity contribute to the social worker’s ability to handle difficult circumstances as well as to provide the individual with increased flexibility and a broader perspective. If organizational issues are not addressed, then burnout could require a job or career change (Adams et al., 2006; Figley, 1995, 2002; Sabin-Farrell & Turpin, 2003). OBJECTIVES To establish the prevalence of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in adult, pediatric, and neonatal critical care nurses and to describe potential contributing demographic, unit, and …